Gastronomy 101, a blog about food and Los Angeles restaurants

MISC.: Guess the Next Food Trend, Round 2

A couple of weeks ago, I predicted the next food trend, after cupcakes, and natural frozen yogurts would be donuts.

Now this morning, I read about Fritelli's Donuts and Coffee in Beverly Hills, which has over 40 flavors of donut to choose from, including "lemon poppy, green apple fritter, pumpkin, and Vermont maple," and not only that, but "they use real fruit and fine chocolate in their fillings and glazes."

Okay, now let's quote from my previous post, regarding the kind of donut shop I envisioned: "You make these in exotic flavors with fresh ingredients infusing your icings and glazes."

So, it's not a trend yet. But I was one step ahead of at least one shop. And if it catches on, and suddenly there are gourmet donut and coffee shops everywhere, then I will offer my services out as food trend consultant. I already have some other ideas.

On the other hand, if it fizzles away quietly, then I will retire, never to bother anyone with food trend speculation again.

17 comments:

I bet your last name is Fritelli!!!

You've snookered us into believing you were in no way associated with that shop of evil fried donoughty pleasures! I'm on to your shameful scheme to promote your side business!!! You want us to run out and buy your sinfully delicious wads of greasy goodness as if you innocently predicted their arrival from the smoke of a burning bush!

Hey, speaking of a burning Bush, let me update your foreign readers on the outcome of our elections... :)

said by Acme Instant Food at 1:00 PM Delete

I WISH my last name was Fritelli. Then as long as I had some calorie-burning metabolistic cola, I would be set for life.

said by KT at 1:06 PM Delete

Nice prediction about donuts! word. I think everybody is ready for backlash from the carb-free fad...what better way than by enjoying fried carbs...esp.in exotic flavors. Nice prediction!

said by chicopants at 2:24 PM Delete

honestly, KT, I finally have a guess on the next huge food trend.

It's whole grain, srouted, sustainable versions of old favorites. Like a deep fried donut, but the batter is sprouted multi-grain, the oil is from organic soy beans, and . . .

okay, I'm wrong already.

Nostradamus signing out.

said by Jeremy at 3:29 PM Delete

Nice try buddy ... have you ever seen a vegan donut?

I like to eat healthy, but donuts are not about healthy. I eat healthy so that I can sometimes eat donuts.

said by KT at 3:38 PM Delete

You have your finger on the arteriosclerosis-riddled pulse, my friend.

said by Vaguely Urban at 3:59 PM Delete

Ew! Maybe I should take it off ... when you put it that way, it sounds gross.

said by KT at 4:01 PM Delete

Wait! now I've got it for sure.

PURE FLAVORS. No bullshit. Like a lump of sugar taken from sugar cane, given to you in a pixie-stick, with no sensation but "sweet." OR a whole vanilla bean, just by itself. Yeah, that's the ticket!

Okay, I'll be serious fo ra sec -- nobody has ever LOST money betting on the stupidity (or at least silliness) of the populace at large. All of the last few big crazes seem to be upper-classish versions of old favorites for the masses that rich folk probably think they are too healthy or too classy for. So they jazz it up. An acceptable donut (Krispy Creme), yogurt (pinkberry), cream puff (beard papa), cupcake (everywhere).

So -- fresh-served potato chips? Hot-off-the deep fryer (or whatever) pork rinds? Little, tiny custom bowls of chili made with Kobe Beef instead of ground round?

C'mon, I'm onto something here. BELIEVE IT!

said by Jeremy at 9:09 AM Delete

Pure flavors is already a trend - that's part of the whole molecular gastronomy thing with the spheres and the spritzes, a lot of that is all about bursts of pure flavor.

I would laugh so hard if someone gave me a vanilla bean to eat. Thanks for the stick, but I'm not a dog.

But I do think that a gourmet junk food shop would be awesome. Most chefs have at least one thing in their repertoire that fits that description, so why not a whole restaurant?

said by KT at 10:23 AM Delete

Pure flavors is already a trend - that's part of the whole molecular gastronomy thing with the spheres and the spritzes, a lot of that is all about bursts of pure flavor.

I would laugh so hard if someone gave me a vanilla bean to eat. Thanks for the stick, but I'm not a dog.

But I do think that a gourmet junk food shop would be awesome. Most chefs have at least one thing in their repertoire that fits that description, so why not a whole restaurant?

said by KT at 10:24 AM Delete

not the molecular thing; IU just think it'd be funny to be given rock candy on a stick and charged $40 for the "purity of sugar" flavor. I think the vanilla bean example captured my joke a little better.

said by Jeremy at 11:55 AM Delete

No, I get it ... I am just being difficult. I can't help it. I'll buy you a vanilla bean next time we're out to make up for it.

said by KT at 11:57 AM Delete

maybe a cinnamon stick?

(I know, I know, don't push your luck, jer)

said by Jeremy at 12:47 PM Delete

Well, I was gonna buy you one of the EXPENSIVE vanilla bean pods, but since you'll settle for a cinnamon stick ...

said by KT at 12:49 PM Delete

Earlier this year I would have said those pate au choux puffs from "Beard Papa" filled with whipped cream are the next food trend. Now I'm betting on the French macaron. Practially no fat, cute little bite size, low in sugar, pretty colors, and the perfect foundation for about a gazillion exotic flavor combinations. I just found a recipe for Dark Chocolate Earl Grey Macarons. But I swear, I'll take a freshly made donut any day!

said by La Vida Dulce at 5:26 PM Delete

I would LOVE if macarons became a new food trend. I would especially love it if bakeries would start opening that had new flavors each season, like in France.

said by Anonymous at 6:53 PM Delete

that's so funny... I totally read that Daily Candy article and thought about your post. prophetic!

said by Colleen Cuisine at 10:11 AM Delete

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